The Age of Reason (Penguin Modern Classics)

£4.995
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The Age of Reason (Penguin Modern Classics)

The Age of Reason (Penguin Modern Classics)

RRP: £9.99
Price: £4.995
£4.995 FREE Shipping

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He and Marcelle have been together for some seven years, but it's an odd, hidden arrangement of convenience: he sneaks into her house -- careful not to wake her mother -- a few times a week and otherwise is on his merry way. Boris scratched his head in perplexity, and wondered what was the origin of these destructive impulses which gripped him from time to time. Towards the end of the story, Mathieu sneaks back into Lola’s apartment with the key Boris gave him and this time does steal 4,000 of her Francs. The Age of Reason is the first of the trilogy, a third-person narrative set in Paris in 1938 which focuses on two days in the life of Mathieu Delarue (French for ‘of the street’).

He had a warm, attractive laugh, and Boris liked him because he opened his mouth wide when he laughed. Such impending disaster makes many innocuous day-to-day endeavours trivial, of course, but at this stage his creations are busying themselves worrying about ageing, money, and relationships. He’s introduced in chapter 7 and it’s quickly established he’s a Machiavellian sort blessed with exceptional good looks. She sometimes had the feeling that her life had come to a stop one day at noon, and she herself was an embodied, eternal noontide brooding upon her little world, a dank and rainy world, without hope or purpose….Mathieu is a 34-year-old, tall, gangly philosophy teacher who spends a lot of time mooching round the streets of Paris feeling sorry for himself. Boris Serguine is the highly lovable young philosophy student of Mathieu’s who worships his professor. Finally, in the final sentence, he acknowledges: “It’s true, it’s absolutely true: I have attained the age of reason.

This bizarre young student clearly has all many of psychological issues which make her difficult to be around, but due to her good looks she arouses great interest. Sometimes an event occurs (such as in Matthieu's case, with him getting his girlfriend pregnant) which forces one to accept the responsibility and, as some suggest, grow up.The room was filled with stale heat which had spent its force outside, and left its radiance in the folds of the curtain, and was stagnating there, inert and ominous like a human destiny. I first read the Age of Reason in early 2005 aged 19 and it transformed my view of literature—it’s at once a gripping and brilliant story, but it also deals with Sartre’s complex philosophical concepts.

Iron in the Soul concluded the trilogy in 1949, with Sartre abandoning the fourth novel the Last Chance for a variety of reasons (in part due to becoming bored with the limitations of novel writing—he’d made his point and moved on to new projects). Economic slavery is a term that probably does not relate to this, but it is defining our freedom based upon the amount of money that we have. This makes Delarue laugh, but it’s apparent it’s the only way to get the money from the conniving fiend.Feeling connected with the Serguines due to recent events, a bolt of lightning surrounding Lola stuns the three of them. Put like that, maybe Sartre and his philosophy have disappeared because they have been so thoroughly subsumed into our modern attitude.

If the book does not rise to the stature of a great, or even a very good, novel, it at least does not try to show a great panorama of society, and fail. This causes some consternation but, drunk, she announces it to be a “very agreeable sensation” and she likes “seeing [her] blood”. The Age of Reason is concerned with Sartre's conception of freedom as the ultimate aim of human existence. This abandonment is of their own choosing or unavoidable because they are conscious, disgruntled and bored individuals, committed to denouncement of bourgeois and the lives they lead.Incidentally, as everyone is about to get pretty inebriated in this section, during this era getting drunk is referred to as being “tight”. This book asks more questions than it answers, creates more doubts than it clarifies, precisely, leaves one in the lurch. They seem intent on making their way in life, but a mixture of laziness, eccentricity, and a reliance on their affability and good looks means they seem destined to have everything handled for them.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
  • Sold by: Fruugo

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